Portraits of Women

Artist: Joanna Boyce Wells
Title: Head of a Mulatto Woman (Fanny Eaton)
Date: 1861
Joanna Boyce Wells was heavily influenced by the pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. Well, she was also the sister of George Price Boyce (who was a pre-Raphaelite watercolorist). Unfortunately, Joanna died at the age of thirty, from childbirth, in 1861.

Artist: Joanna Boyce Wells

Title: Head of a Mulatto Woman (Fanny Eaton)

Date: 1861

Joanna Boyce Wells was heavily influenced by the pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. Well, she was also the sister of George Price Boyce (who was a pre-Raphaelite watercolorist). Unfortunately, Joanna died at the age of thirty, from childbirth, in 1861.

Artist: John Singer SargentTitle: Head of a Capri Girl
Date: 1878
Umut introduced me John Singer Sargent (Okay okay, I must feel a little bit ashamed for not knowing him). His portraits are wonderful! The women, they all kinda look like they’re pissed of. This agressive attitude towards the painter makes these women look more and more confident and sexier. This 17-year old girl in the picture is Rosina Ferrara, an inhibitant of the Capri island. While being Sargent’s muse, she also posed for many other painters. From Wikipedia: “Ferrara was described by various artists as an “Arab/Greek style”, the type seen in classical art, such as that of Ancient Greek. Greek colonists settled in Capri in ancient times and left their mark in their descendants. In the 19th century, artists and writers from all over Europe and America traveled to Capri to see the beauty of the island and of its inhabitants; Caprese and Neapolitan-area women are renowned for their beauty.”

Artist: John Singer Sargent

Title: Head of a Capri Girl

Date: 1878

Umut introduced me John Singer Sargent (Okay okay, I must feel a little bit ashamed for not knowing him). His portraits are wonderful! The women, they all kinda look like they’re pissed of. This agressive attitude towards the painter makes these women look more and more confident and sexier. This 17-year old girl in the picture is Rosina Ferrara, an inhibitant of the Capri island. While being Sargent’s muse, she also posed for many other painters. From Wikipedia: “Ferrara was described by various artists as an “Arab/Greek style”, the type seen in classical art, such as that of Ancient Greek. Greek colonists settled in Capri in ancient times and left their mark in their descendants. In the 19th century, artists and writers from all over Europe and America traveled to Capri to see the beauty of the island and of its inhabitants; Caprese and Neapolitan-area women are renowned for their beauty.”

While writing a paper about the late republican period of Rome, I just remembered this funerary painting of a Roman woman (Femina Romana in Latin). Don’t know its date but she is quite a beauty, don’t you think? 

While writing a paper about the late republican period of Rome, I just remembered this funerary painting of a Roman woman (Femina Romana in Latin). Don’t know its date but she is quite a beauty, don’t you think? 

Artist: Gari Melchers
Title: The Bride
Date: 1907
Gari Melchers was an American naturalist painter.

Artist: Gari Melchers

Title: The Bride

Date: 1907

Gari Melchers was an American naturalist painter.

Artist: Kotondo Torii (1900-1976)
Title: Hair Combing from the serie of “Twelve Aspects of Women”
Date: 1932
This kind of depiction (woman combing her hair) is very common in Japanese art. With the second half on the 19th century, we start to see European painters influenced heavily by Japanese art, must be a side effect of Japan’s newly opened borders (by Americans’ force of course, remember Matthew C. Perry) after hundreds of years of isolation. You can trace this fashion clearly from some of Van Gogh’s paintings. We also see the same thing what Ingres did with his Orientalist women; Japanese women began to occupy the center of these paintings as exotic objects (I have reaaa-ally nice examples however I will keep them for another post). Whatever, I’m babbling again… So, in the end the theme of woman combing her hair became very popular among  Western painters, look at Degas’ serie of bathing women to clearly get the idea.
About the blog:
Well, I’m not sure what to write as an opening post about this new blog of mine but I will try to describe it briefly and explain the content:Lately, I realized that I am obsessed with depictions of feminity in plastic arts. Not talking about paintings or photographs with detailed backgrounds but simple portraits, putting the emphasis only on the woman. Because the number of (digital) portraits in my collection is increasing day by day, I finally decided to open a blog where I can keep my precious pictures and also share them with people.

Artist: Kotondo Torii (1900-1976)

Title: Hair Combing from the serie of “Twelve Aspects of Women”

Date: 1932

This kind of depiction (woman combing her hair) is very common in Japanese art. With the second half on the 19th century, we start to see European painters influenced heavily by Japanese art, must be a side effect of Japan’s newly opened borders (by Americans’ force of course, remember Matthew C. Perry) after hundreds of years of isolation. You can trace this fashion clearly from some of Van Gogh’s paintings. We also see the same thing what Ingres did with his Orientalist women; Japanese women began to occupy the center of these paintings as exotic objects (I have reaaa-ally nice examples however I will keep them for another post). Whatever, I’m babbling again… So, in the end the theme of woman combing her hair became very popular among  Western painters, look at Degas’ serie of bathing women to clearly get the idea.

About the blog:

Well, I’m not sure what to write as an opening post about this new blog of mine but I will try to describe it briefly and explain the content:
Lately, I realized that I am obsessed with depictions of feminity in plastic arts. Not talking about paintings or photographs with detailed backgrounds but simple portraits, putting the emphasis only on the woman. Because the number of (digital) portraits in my collection is increasing day by day, I finally decided to open a blog where I can keep my precious pictures and also share them with people.